Marketing Glossary

  Terms beginning with b
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Back Matter
(Also called "end matter.") Items placed after the main body of a document. Examples of back matter include appendices and indices.
Contributed by: MarcommWise Staff
Backgrounder
A document containing background information about a product, company, service or event.
Contributed by: MarcommWise Staff
Banner Ad
On the Web, a standard advertisement (either static or animated) that normally, although not necessarily, appears near the top of a Web page. The term is generally taken to mean a particular size ad (industry standard: 468 x 60 pixels) rather than placement on the page.
Contributed by: MarcommWise Staff
Barrier to Entry
A hurdle that a new competitor would have to overcome in order to enter the market for a particular product class. For example, a patent that locks up an entire product class is an extremely high barrier to entry. It can only be overcome if a substitute product can be developed without breaking the patent. Patents aren't the only barriers to entry, requirements for the investment extremely high up-front capital costs or the need for expert skills that are in very short supply would also be barriers to entry. Likewise, if it is a mature market and customers must incur high costs to switch from their existing supplier to a new one, this too would be a high barrier. These are only a few examples of barriers to entry. Others exist.
Contributed by: MarcommWise Staff
Belly Band Advertising
Advertising that is printed on a band (of any width up to the dimension of the publication) wrapped around a newspaper or magazine. This wrapper is designed such that reader cannot read the publication until he or she removes the wrapper.
Contributed by: MarcommWise Staff
Below-the-line
Below-the-Line Advertising - all advertising communications where no commission is payable, outside the five major media - the press, television, radio, cinema and outdoors; below-the-line includes direct mail, print such as sales literature and catalogues, sponsorship, merchandising, exhibitions,etc.
Contributed by: Felicity Kelly
Bingo Card
A card inserted into a publication that allows readers to request information from one or more of a group of companies listed on the card.
Contributed by: MarcommWise Staff
Bleed
Ads, illustrations or photographic images printed so as to run to the edge of the page (after trimming if the page is trimmed).
Contributed by: MarcommWise Staff
Blind Ad
An advertisement that does not identify the advertiser, but provides a box number for replies.
Contributed by: MarcommWise Staff
Blocking Chart
A graph of a planned media schedule.
Contributed by: MarcommWise Staff
Blow-In Card
A printed card "blown" into a publication and, therefore, loose rather than bound to the publication.
Contributed by: MarcommWise Staff
Blueline Proof
A one-color print typically used as a final check (other than to check colors) of the film that will be used to create a print piece.
Contributed by: MarcommWise Staff
Blurb
  1. Boilerplate language.

  2. A short piece of text, usually no more than a single short paragraph, describing a company, person, product, service, or event. The blurb is used inside a larger marketing communication vehicle. For example, an event program may include company blurbs describing the sponsors of the event.
Contributed by: MarcommWise Staff
Body Copy
The main text of any marketing communications vehicle.
Contributed by: MarcommWise Staff
Boilerplate
Prewritten, standardized copy used whenever a particular marketing communication requirement arises. It may be written to adhere to legal or company standards. It may also be used to eliminate the need for original writing when a specific communication requirement is likely to arise frequently.
Contributed by: MarcommWise Staff


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